13 Awesome Siberian Mysteries

Siberia happens to be one of the most sparsely populated areas in the world. The density of population is only 3 people per kilometer. The place covers around 77 percent of Russia, but inhabits only 27 percent of the country’s population. It is famous for the Siberian mysteries, which captivate the imagination of many. The following is a list of 13 awesome Siberian mysteries.

1. The Shigir Idol

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The Shigir Idol was found during an excavation in the 19th century. This idol is believed to be a prototype of a totem and happens to be created around 11,000 years old. This makes it older than the Stonehenge and the Egyptian Pyramids. The structure was found in a marsh which helped in preserving the idea over such a long period. A lot of features of this idol have been well preserved. It is 2.8 meters tall and has been carved out on a large tree trunk. It is believed that the furrows on the body of this particular idol had encrypted information. The carvings have been made from stone tools.

2. Bone Armor

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One of the most interesting Siberian mysteries is the bone armor. It was unearthed rather recently, and it’s an armor made from animal bones. It was a protective gear which was buried 1.5 meters inside the ground and was found in a surprisingly good condition. Researchers believe that the bone armor could involve a ritual, and might be a gift to an elite warrior. It could have belonged to the Samus-Seymiskaya culture which lived near the Altai movement before they migrated to the southwest.

3. Gender Bending Amazon

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According to Greek philosopher Hippocrates, the Scythian tribes had female warriors who were called Amazons. So when an unearthed body appeared in the 1990s, it was believed that the historians had found a body of the female warriors. Later it was realized that in actuality, the warrior was a young boy who is believed to be all of 16 when he died. DNA analysis noted that the boy was buried around fertility symbols like amulets and cowrie shells. Since it was a young boy’s grave, the wooden pillow, as well as the coffin, was smaller in size which led to all the confusion.

4. The first cancer patient

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Many scientists have been under the impression that cancer is a modern disease. It was believed that the early man had unadulterated, preservative free, fresh food and was very active which did not lead to the growth of cancer in their body. However, the unearthing of a man belonging to the Bronze Siberian age has shattered this myth. This man who was buried in a fetal position was suffering from prostate cancer. This body is the oldest and the first ever confirmed case of cancer in this world. It is believed that the man must have had an agonizing death.

Also Read: 15 Ancient Greek Philosophers and their Contributions

5. Idol with realigned racial features

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The Ust-Taseyevsky idol which is believed to be 2400 years old has undergone a number of “plastic surgeries”. Well, the original idol had a bushy beard, thick mustache, flared nostrils and an open mouth. Later, around 1500 years ago, with the Mongol influx into the region, the features of this idol were altered. The eyes were narrowed, the facial contours were changed; the mustache and beard were shaved off to a large extent and the bridge of the nose was flattened. This was done to make the idol look less Caucasian and more Asian. Further alterations were made in the 17th century, when the Russians occupied the place; a hole was drilled into the mouth to fit a tobacco pipe.

6. The oldest sewing needle

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It is believed that the Denisovan clan was a technologically advanced race. It is perhaps this reason as to why the world’s first needle was found in the Denisova cave. The needle is around 50,000 years old and has a hole in the end for the thread to go in. Made from the bone of an unknown bird, this needle is believed to be used by non-homo sapiens. It is 2.8 inches in length and it is the longest needle to be ever found by researchers and archaeologists.

7. Siberians performed brain surgery 3,000 years ago

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A body was unearthed back in the year 2015, and evidence shows that the man must have undergone brain surgery. Research and analysis prove that the man must be in his 30 or 40s and underwent surgical procedures around 3,000 years ago. It is evident that the man must have died due to post-surgery inflammation, however, there are signs of healing which proves he must have lived after the surgery was performed. Painkillers such as thyme, cannabis, juniper, etc. must have been used to ease the pain during and post surgery.